Slap Wacky! is slap-tacular!  The goal of Slap Wacky! is to put together the craziest shape patterns with the playing cards before the cards run out.  When a player completes a shape, that player has to slap the design to earn the points – and fast, or that player could be blocked by other players.  The player who scores the most points from the shapes wins!

This game is great for promoting visual skills, hand-eye coordination and math skills – plus, when else do you get to slam down on the table?

Contains:  72 Shape Cards, 6 Wild Cards, 6 Block Cards, Instructions

• Ages 7 & up • 2-6 Players • 3-4 minutes per game

Let Me Know When It’s Available

“Fun Game that Evokes Speed and Challenge.”

“Enjoyable for numerous rounds of play and easy to understand. The bright colors and unique patterns are engaging. Fun and easy! Great, colorful directions. Easy to follow.” – MENSA MIND GAMES

“Loads of Fun for the Whole Family!”

– PARENT TO PARENT

“Fast and Furious with Lots of Laugh and Fun.”

“If you like your games fast and furious with lots of laughs and fun, then check out Slap Wacky. The wackiness occurs as players try to simultaneously complete shapes with the uniquely illustrated cards in the set. As soon as a shape is completed, the player slaps it and takes it off the board to earn points.  Parents enjoyed seeing children let their inhibitions go and really get into it.” – THE NATIONAL PARENTING CENTER

“High Energy Game.”

“This is a very high energy game that keeps everyone involved throughout play. The fast pace and ease of play makes Slap Wacky a quick game both to learn and to play. The children loved playing and asked to play on a daily basis.”

– iPARENTING MEDIA AWARDS

Read More Reviews on Amazon

Promotes And Reinforces Visual Astuteness

Increases Hand-Eye Coordination

Develops Math Skills. Reinforces:

• Ability to match objects and recognize patterns through geometric shapes

• Strategies for recognizing patterns

• Comparing, sorting and classifying skills

• Identification of similarities and differences in sets of objects